Big Ten Retirees Association
Annual Meeting
August 22-24,1999
University of Iowa
Iowa City

 

Sunday:
Registration for out-of-town attendees was in the Iowa Memorial Union on Sunday afternoon. All guests were housed in the Iowa House which is located in the Memorial Union building.

The activities began Sunday night at 6:30 pm with a reception and dinner in the Green Assembly Hall of the Levitt Center for University Advancement. Out of town guests were transported back and forth between the Iowa House and LCUA by vans and automobiles during the entire duration of the conference.

After dinner Jon Whitmore, the Provost of the University of Iowa, gave a short welcoming message. During his remarks he mentioned the initiation at Iowa of an Advisory Council of Retired Professors to the Provost. This is to be a two-way street of ideas as to how retirees can assist the University and how the University can assist retirees.

Dr. Christine Grant, Director of Women's Athletics at Iowa, and Professor Bonnie Slatton, Iowa's Faculty Representative to the Big Ten and the NCAA, presented a "History of the Integration of Women's Athletics into the Big Ten." They described the development in the 1960s of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW), designed to foster athletic competition for women. This was a time when neither the Big Ten nor the NCAA had any interest in women's sports. In 1972, when Title IX (the federal anti-discrimination statute) was passed, the NCAA lobbied to get athletics exempted from compliance so that colleges and universities would not need to provide equal athletics opportunities for men and women. When that failed both the NCAA and the Big Ten won control of women's athletics, despite the fact that many women in athletics tried to keep control of their programs in the AIAW. Professors Grant and Slatton described the reluctance of most NCAA and Big Ten leaders to give women any say in athletics governance, despite their being forced into these organizations. In the Big Ten, most of the athletic directors, as well as some of the faculty representatives, refused to even acknowledge the two women who headed athletics programs on their campuses. That situation has now largely changed and all the Big Ten institutions are working toward equality of athletic opportunities for men and women. At present, participation in the conference is 60% men, 40% women. However, women are losing ground in coaching as men are slowly taking over most coaching positions in women's athletics. Men now hold 52% of the coaching positions in women's sports in this country.

The evening ended with a flare--literally. Participants moved to the north deck of the LCUA to view a wonderful fireworks display, which was part of the opening of the fall semester program of the University.

Monday:
After an 8:00 am continental breakfast in the fourth-floor lobby of LCUA, the conferees settled in the gorgeous round Iowa Foundation Board Room to begin their meetings

Iowa Foundation Board Room

David Skorton, Vice-president for Research at Iowa, gave a short presentation in which he reported that the Big Ten Universities account for 15% of all graduate degrees in the nation and 15% of all library holdings. He also mentioned that all of the Big Ten Universities are in the "top 31 schools" of the nation. "Why? Because our states support education."

The next speaker was Professor Lorraine Dorfman of Iowa who has authored a book called "The Sun Still Shone: Professors Talk About Retirement" (University of Iowa Press). Prof. Dorfman gave a fascinating presentation of her research for this book. Her work included interviewing retired faculty in the U.S. and Britain for eleven years concerning such things as:

Did you plan for retirement?  Majority yes
Did you remain in your same community?  90% yes
Are you positive about retirement?  Majority yes, but a few very negative
Are you continuing professional activities?  84-89% yes, but this drops off as
retirees age
Are you volunteering?  50+ % yes
Have you found a new leisure activity?  50+ % yes

Prof. Dorfman's summary: "continuity, activity, and adaptation are the keys to a satisfactory retirement."

Next came the first of three "Show and Tell" sessions. All will be summarized together at the end of this report.

After lunch in the Green Assembly Room, Patricia Lounsbury, Coordinator of Cardiovascular Health Assessment Management and Prevention Services at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, presented a program called, "Staying Fit: Exercise Programs for Retirees and Where to Find Expertise on Your Campus/in Your Campus Community." Ms. Lounsbury was most convincing that all persons, especially retirees, need to exercise regularly to decrease their LDL, blood pressure, and stress. She emphasized that abdominal fat increases risk of heart disease and that the large leg muscles are most important in exercise. Even ten minutes of exercise at a time can help, so "do it!"

After the next "Show and Tell" the participants were transported by a large University of Iowa coach (bus to most of you) through the campus and out Highway 6 for eighteen miles to the Amana Colonies. This settlement is something unique to Iowa, and the group was invited to tour the lovely home (built in 1900) and gardens of Larry Rettig who is an associate in the office of the Vice-president for Research at Iowa. More importantly he was born and raised in the Amanas and has written a book, "The History of the Amana Colonies from 1932 to the Present." Larry and his wife Wilma were most gracious and then accompanied us to dinner at the Ox Yoke Inn, a typical Amana restaurant (a communal kitchen for the colony until 1932) for good German cooking and beer. After dinner Larry gave a lecture on the Colonies and answered the many questions conferees had. The late night got everyone home about 10:15.

Tuesday:

Note the excellent BigTen sweatshirt provided to the attendees!

Again continental breakfast at LCUA at 8:00 am followed by a "follow-up" session of "Show and Tell". Again, see below. Then Derek Willard, Associate Vice-president for Research in charge of Federal relations, spoke on a timely and important topic; "Update on Federal Government Actions and Proposed Actions Affecting Research Universities, Including Medicare Reform." Willard mentioned that most Big Ten Universities have a representative in Washington D.C. Together these representatives make an impressive and powerful voice to lobby for their institutions. He said because the U.S. is at peace and the defense budget has been cut there is more funding available now. NEA and NEH are both beginning to recover funds which were cut in recent years. Last year NIH received a 15% increase in funding. Willard spoke about three areas he monitors; 1) appropriations, especially those for HHS and student aid; 2) the tax bill, which has many helpful sections in it but which will probably be vetoed; and 3) Medicare, which is important for Iowa because of our large teaching hospital. When asked if it does any good for citizens to write (or e-mail) their congress people he said yes, but do it individually - not as a mass mailing.

Willard L. (Sandy) Boyd, President Emeritus of the University of Iowa and of the Field Museum of Chicago, was the next speaker. His topic was "Life on a Big Ten Campus during the 1960s and '70s." Sandy outlined a history of University concerns beginning with the 1950s, giving his views on how our institutions have changed:

  • The curriculum has become more specialized
  • Research has been stressed since WWII and is now considered key to keeping America a world leader in science. The universities are the designated providers of this research. Research and teaching are primary for universities.
  • Finances are always tight. Federal funds provide research capabilities, but the unrestricted State money is vital. Private funds are needed for the "extras."
  • Academic freedom is the most important issue. Universities are more apt to lose it from within rather than from outside. Iowa universities had a "Balanced Speakers policy," which, unfortunately, did not work during the '70s because unpopular speech was drowned out. Peaceful protest on the campus is proper.
  • Equality of opportunity is critical for our universities.
  • Athletics: The university has an obligation to support its athletes so they leave with an education.

When questioned about his thoughts on affirmative action, Sandy answered with deep conviction that "Affirmative Action begins with an affirmative attitude on the part of each person. The lawyers will have to figure out how to handle it."

Lunch again in the Green Assembly Hall was followed immediately in that same venue by speakers from two corporations in Iowa City that exemplify successful spinoffs for university research and creative work. Loyal Steube from National Computer Systems explained in detail all of the capabilities of his corporation. NCS is a "Global Information Services Company," selling hardware, software, sample documents and curriculum mostly to educational agencies but also to others; e.g. the Olympics and the National Census 2000. They are vigorously exploring turning to electronic processing replacing paper in the not too distant future.

Jim Maxey from American College Testing, a not-for-profit company, explained ACT's program and service areas. Basically ACT measures the educational development of students in kindergarten through professional school. ACT provides services for admissions, placement, and outcome assessments and does many surveys of educational information. Thirty-seven percent of all high school graduates take the ACT for college placement.

Both ACT and NCS grew out of the thinking and research done in the 1940s and 1950s at the University of Iowa by Professor E.F. Lindquist, a genius in the field of testing and statistics.

The Meeting was adjourned on Tuesday at 1:15 pm.

THE NEXT BIG TEN MEETING WILL BE AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY- AUGUST 20-22, 2000

Notes by Kathie Belgum,
Secretary



SHOW AND TELL - BIG TEN RETIREE ASSOCIATIONS AT WORK

 School

 Year Assn. Formed
 Univ.Funds/yr?

 Office?

 Members

 Dues
 Purdue

 1987

$5000. Free sec'y

 Yes

 All who qualify

None. Rule of "70"
 Penn State

 1948

 $1000

 No

 727

 $9 for 3 years
 Ohio State

 1984

 Yes

Yes, plus 2 sec'ys

 1143

 $8/year
 Minnesota

 1974

Very little.
No sec'y

 Yes

 850

 $20/year
 Wisconsin

 1999

 Foundation & Provost

Yes. Foundation

 480

$20/year incl. spouse

Michigan State

 1949

Small amount. Volunteer staff

Yes & telephone

 1500

 $5/year
 Michigan

 1996 (origin in '50s)

 For mailings.
501C3 status.
Part-time sec'y

 Yes & computer

 1200

 $7.50/year
 Indiana

 1975

 No

No. Pay to use U mail service

 500

$5/year Spouse $4
 Illinois

 1970

  Yes, for travel

Yes

 1500

 $20/year
 Iowa

 1995

 Very little

 Yes, combined with "governance group"

 500

 $10/year


Significant items of "show and tell" by institution, in the order presented:

Purdue: An interesting survey entitled "Retiree Access to Computing and Network Privileges," with responses by the Big Ten retirees associations, was handed out. (The survey is appended at the end of this meeting report.) There are many differences in such privileges throughout the Big Ten. The University is funding a survey of retired faculty to determine need for an independent place on campus and what contributions retirees have made to the university. The retirees association raised more than $12,000 to honor the wife of retiring President Beering with a garden on campus. They are working on obtaining a health care supplement to assist with costs for glasses, dental work, and prescriptions.

Penn State: The President enters a four-year commitment when selected. Their large project is protecting "underpaid" retirees (or spouses) who are in dire straits. Needy persons can receive "Emergency Gift Grants" of up to $600. These funds go through the University Business Office. They do not have a representative on the University benefits committee. There are normally six meetings per year, with speaker and food.

Ohio State: The organization is highly organized and consists of six committees. A large packet of materials was passed out to conferees. Ohio State has many interest groups, e.g. "An Introduction to Basic Computer Skills," which is one-on-one teaching by a retiree. They are educating pre-retirement people concerning "options" for retirement plans. They provide a Continuing Education Program with reduced costs for persons over 60. They also provide a "Post-retirement Handbook." They combine with other retirees in a state system (only colleges and universities) for lobbying purposes. There are 91,000 persons represented. An endowment fund of $38,000 is used for education for retirees. They do have a representative on the University Benefits Committee.

Minnesota: Has five activities for its retirees:
1) Monthly luncheons on the fourth Tuesday are held in the Campus Club, with between 50 and 120 in attendance. There are nine newsletters published each year.
2) The retirees work to make sure Central Administration subsidizes any retiree so he/she receives a minimum of $32,000 per year.
3) Retirees may stay on the University health insurance plan, but they must pay the premium (about $7000/yr). They are trying to get a tax advantage for this payment.
4) They staff a Volunteer Center, which is open five hours a day, to match up needs and retiree volunteers.
5) There is a person in Central Administration who acts as a liaison to retirees. They are working on a long-range plan to maximize retirees' influence on the University and vice versa.
Two concerns of the group are: being treated as second-class citizens by the University and holding/building their membership.

Wisconsin: The bylaws were enacted May 12, 1999. The organization has "tight ties" back to the University Administration through a Governance Committee. Active (non-retired) members make up 25% of this group. There are 19,000 eligible members in Madison. Concerns for the retirees and for which they have set up committees are: pre-retirement life styles; problems of aging parents and dependent children of retirees; and bereavement. They are also concerned with health and well being, financial planning, communication, and travel.
Position Paper: Wisconsin passed out a position paper concerning two important issues in society. These are 1) violence and 2) the burgeoning numbers of the elderly. They are suggesting that the Big Ten Retirees Associations, using the wealth of talent among their memberships, develop a strong statement in three particular areas to counterbalance the single-mindedness of AARP on the following issues:
-- What challenges us in our society?
-- How can we build bridges to the younger generation?
-- How can we age with dignity?
Wisconsin has requested that each retiree association discuss this position paper with its Executive Committee and relay its thinking to Alma Baron.

Michigan State: The organization put on a conference, "The Road Next Traveled," staffed by retirees, for persons about to retire. Members are also involved in a mentoring project for retirees. Life insurance and medical insurance are fully provided to retirees. Now the group is working on some sort of help with prescription costs. The organization publishes nine newsletters each year and has a potential membership of 3000. Retirees also have free parking privileges on campus.

Michigan: The UM Web site address is <www.umich.edu/~hraa/umra>. The Michigan web site is also home to the Big Ten web site, which can be selected from the home page. Retirees have a choice of health plans: Blue Cross-Blue Shield and HMOs MCARE, and Care Choices, which are co-pay. They do have a representative on the University Committee on Economic Status of the Faculty. The UM Benefits Office states that it spends nearly $13,000,000 per year on health benefits for 5000 retirees. The University reimburses retirees 70% of the amount deducted for Medicare from their Social Security checks. Retirees may acquire a free parking permit for post-3:00 PM parking on campus. The retirees association meets monthly, September - May.

Indiana: Only retirees who are part of TIAA/CREF are eligible for the Annuitants Association of Indiana. The Articles of the Association are purposefully ambiguous and open to a fair amount of interpretation. Retirees must pay all health insurance premiums, $296 per month. Retirees do not receive free on-campus parking but do receive the daily University newspaper mailed to their home free of charge. The meetings are held off campus at the Indiana Foundation building monthly, September - May, with attendance between 70 and 120. The newsletter is published nine times each year. Indiana will host the Big Ten retirees in the year 2000.

Illinois: Under a statewide system for retirement the retirees were successful in getting a 3% increase in annual funding for their members. There are 35 Illinois Annuitants Association chapters in the state. There is an office in Springfield with an Executive Director and secretary for the combined State University and Community College Retirement organizations. The retirees association receives free photocopying and e-mail. Also the University maintains the personnel records for retirees. Members may park on campus at meters. Retirees receive free state health insurance. The association would like assistance from the University for mailing costs. There are two meetings a year, held on Sundays, with attendance around 100. Two newsletters are published each year. The spring issue is mailed to all 6,500 potential members. The association is now lobbying to increase the retirement income of longtime retirees whose benefits are not good. They have received a promised increase of $25/mo./year served/number years retired which should help a great deal.

Iowa: The retirees have a close working relationship with the Iowa Foundation. The Foundation maintains the associations' mailing list and provides meeting space for the Executive Committee. The University has recently provided office space for the combined usage of the Retirees Association, the Faculty Senate, and the Staff Council. The space contains telephones, computers, and photocopying equipment, which can be used by the Association. Retiree members may use this space if they need access to an office on campus. The University has been doing a good job of adding to the benefits of retirees who might fall below the poverty line. The group sponsors monthly programs, other than during summer months, and has started some small interest groups; e.g. a memoirs writing group. The newest project is the writing of a Retirees Handbook. The Staff Benefits Office has offered to help with this and to pick up the cost. The association is working on eliminating the discrimination between faculty and staff in retirement, specifically as related to free parking stickers and free e-mail. The organization uses the Iowa Foundation's tax-exempt status for its business. The Provost's office has recently appointed a Faculty Emeritus Council to plan for what emeritus faculty can do for the University and vice versa.



List of attendees at the conference:

Illinois: Bill Stallman, Mike Stallman, Betty Hembrough

Indiana: Bill Kroll, Kate Kroll

Michigan: Ethel Rathbun

Michigan State: Fred Graham, Velmer Oakley

Minnesota: Bill Gardner

Ohio State: Isabel Miller, George Crepeau

Penn State: Jack MacMillan, Jane MacMillan, Jack Ziegler, Jane Ziegler

Purdue: Gus Gustafson, Howard Diesslin

Wisconsin: Char Tortorice, Joe Corry, Alma Baron, Lee Baron

Iowa: Sam Becker (Chairman.), Jim Clifton, Libby Stroud, Art Canter, Gordon Strayer, Harold Engen, Bill Ogelsby, John Nothnagle, Lee Shope, Kathie Belgum

Assistants: Faye Strayer, Miriam Canter, Marge Hoppin, Dick Hoppin, Daryl Wyrick, Joan Cantor, Charles Mason, Mildred Lavin, Eleanor Anstey, Tom Hulme, Jean Hulme, Ian Smith, Jeanne Smith, Ross Hagen, Jaquie Hagen, Al Hood

 



Retiree access to computing
and network privileges

Big Ten University responses

Compiled by Dr. John McLaughlin, Prof. Emer. and Assoc. Dean,
Schools of Engineering, Purdue

Contributed by Donald Gustafson, Purdue

1999 Data

 

 Illinois

 Indiana

Iowa

Michigan

Michigan
State
 Eligibility          
   Retired faculty

 Yes (1)

Yes

Yes

 Emeritus only

 Yes
   Retired Staff

  Yes (1)

 Yes

Yes (4)

 No

 Yes
 Resources:          
   On-campus
   terminals

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes
   Run programs

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

N/A

Yes
   E-Mail

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes
   Dial-up access

 Yes (20 h/wk free)

Yes

Yes (2)

Yes (limited)

Yes
  Internet

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes
 Restrictions

 None

None

None

None

None
 Cost to retiree

 None

None

None

None

None

Main funding
source

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Depts, from central allocation

 Central
Admin

 Application req'd

 N/A

Yes

Yes

Yes

No
           

 

1999 Data

 

 Minnesota

Ohio State

Penn State

Purdue

Wisconsin
 Eligibility          
   Retired faculty

 Yes

(3)

Yes

 Emeritus
only

 Yes
   Retired Staff

  No

 (4)

Yes

 No

 Yes
 Resources:          
   On-campus
   terminals

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes
   Run programs

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

N/A

Special auth. needed
   E-Mail

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes
   Dial-up access

 Yes (20 hr/wk. free)

Yes

Yes (2)

See policy document

Yes
   Internet

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes, from campus terminals (5)

 Yes
 Restrictions

 None

Some systems need special auth

None

See policy document

See "Run Prog" line
 Cost to retiree

 50 hr/mo. free
$4/30 hr/mo. after

 None except restricted systems.

 None

 None except see (5)

 None

Main funding
source

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Central
Admin

 Application req'd

 N/A

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes. ID card required
           

Note (1) Use for University business only is stressed

Note (2) Satisfactory for e-mail but not for web surfing. Most subscribe to an internet service.

Note (3) Emeritus only or by request of dept. chair

Note (4) Emeritus (rare) or by request of dept. chair

Note (5) Internet service from home computer available from GTE at a special rate.


BIG TEN RETIREES ASSOCIATION
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN RETIREES ASSOCIATION
4021 Wolverine Tower   Ann Arbor MI   48109